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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity in rhizosphere spores versus roots of an endangered endemic tree from Argentina: Is fungal diversity similar among forest disturbance types?

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dc.contributor.author Soteras, Florencia
dc.contributor.author Moreira, Bruno Coutinho
dc.contributor.author Grilli, Gabriel
dc.contributor.author Pastor, Nicolás
dc.contributor.author Mendes, Flávia Carneiro
dc.contributor.author Mendes, Daniele Ruela
dc.contributor.author Renison, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi
dc.contributor.author Souza, Francisco Adriano de
dc.contributor.author Becerra, Alejandra
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-29T14:31:56Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-29T14:31:56Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02
dc.identifier.issn 09291393
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsoil.2015.09.003
dc.identifier.uri http://www.locus.ufv.br/handle/123456789/21506
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study was to compare the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community of the rhizosphere and inside the roots of the perennial Polylepis australis tree. Three forest types differing in their structural complexity due to anthropogenic disturbances were chosen at three different sites at the high mountains of central Argentina. Rhizosphere spores and P. australis roots of four randomly selected trees were isolated from 36 soil samples, DNA was extracted and the 18S rDNA fragments were amplified by nested-PCR. The products were analyzed by DGGE and the bands were excised for sequencing. In total, 36 OTUs were defined from 56 DGGE bands successfully sequenced. Forest disturbance types showed similar communities of AMF, as rhizosphere spores and within the roots of P. australis. However, DGGE lustering showed mainly differences between rhizosphere spores and root-colonizing AMF. Members of Glomeraceae, Pacisporaceae, Acaulosporaceae and Gigasporaceae were shown in rhizosphere spore samples. Root samples showed only members of Acaulosporaceae and Gigasporaceae, which might be complementary in terms of soil resources exploration. The prevalence of the root system with their community of symbionts might explain the resilience of AMF soil communities to forests structural changes. This study presents evidence of a possible preference in the AMF–P. australis interaction. en
dc.format pdf pt-BR
dc.language.iso eng pt-BR
dc.publisher Applied Soil Ecology pt-BR
dc.relation.ispartofseries v. 98, p. 272- 277, fev. 2016 pt-BR
dc.rights Elsevier B.V. pt-BR
dc.subject DGGE pt-BR
dc.subject Glomeromycota pt-BR
dc.subject Symbionts pt-BR
dc.subject Soil pt-BR
dc.subject Polylepis australis pt-BR
dc.subject South America pt-BR
dc.title Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity in rhizosphere spores versus roots of an endangered endemic tree from Argentina: Is fungal diversity similar among forest disturbance types? en
dc.type Artigo pt-BR


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  • Artigos [256]
    Artigos Técnico-científicos na área de Microbiologia

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